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Data Reporting

Medicaid and CHIP Renewals: Returning to Regular Operations

States across the country are resuming their regular processes for renewing individuals’ Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage. As this happens, our goal is to help people who are still eligible for Medicaid and CHIP to keep their coverage and help those who are no longer eligible transition to Medicare, employer-sponsored coverage, or Marketplace plans.      

Data from Medicaid and CHIP renewals show how states are resuming regular eligibility operations following the end of the Medicaid continuous enrollment condition authorized by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2023 (CAA, 2023) requires state monthly reporting about activities related to eligibility renewals, call center operations, and transitions to Marketplace coverage, from April 1, 2023, through June 30, 2024. CMS is also providing information such as changes in Medicaid, CHIP and Marketplace enrollment; state operational data; and additional renewal metrics.               

To dive straight into the data, please click through the menu on the left-hand navigation bar. 

Historical Health Coverage Changes 

The Medicaid and CHIP programs provided essential health coverage to millions of people during the COVID-19 public health emergency.                                                                     

The data below show where people in the U.S. got their health coverage before the Medicaid continuous enrollment condition took effect and before it ended. A significant share of these individuals is counted in more than one category — for example, in February 2023, more than 12 million people had both Medicaid and Medicare coverage, and in 2021, 15% of Medicaid enrollees ages 19-64 also had employer-sponsored coverage (where Medicaid is the payer of last resort).1    

Data will be updated as it becomes available. For some data sources, there is a lag of several months.

Pre-Pandemic and Pre-Renewal U.S. Health Coverage: February 2020 and February 2023 (numbers in the millions)
 February 2020February 2023
US Total Population329334
Enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP7193
Enrolled in Marketplace1116
Enrolled in Medicare6266
Dual Enrollment11*12**
Enrolled in Employer Sponsored Coverage179178
Uninsured3227
*Annual total enrollment (full and partial dual enrollment)                                     
**2021 annual enrollment (full and partial dual enrollment)                                     
Note that totals may not sum exactly due to rounding and multiple forms of coverage. Analysis completed by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.                                   
Sourceshttps://www.census.gov/data/tables/time-series/demo/popest/2020s-national-total.html                                     
https://www.census.gov/data/tables/time-series/demo/popest/2010s-national-total.html                                     
https://www.medicaid.gov/medicaid/program-information/medicaid-chip-enrollment-data/medicaid-and-chip-enrollment-trend-snapshot/index.html                                     
https://data.cms.gov/summary-statistics-on-beneficiary-enrollment/medicare-and-medicaid-reports/medicare-monthly-enrollment                                      
https://data.cms.gov/summary-statistics-on-beneficiary-enrollment/medicare-and-medicaid-reports/cms-program-statistics-medicare-medicaid-dual-enrollment 

As noted above, before the continuous enrollment condition took effect, people frequently transitioned coverage. Typically, about 17 million people disenroll from Medicaid or CHIP coverage each year. Some disenroll from coverage because they’re no longer eligible; others because of errors, such as not returning the required paperwork on time. Our goal is to help people who are still eligible for Medicaid and CHIP to keep their coverage and help those who are no longer eligible transition to another source of coverage.

The data below provide an overview of where people leaving Medicaid and CHIP sought coverage in 2018 and 2019.2  This helps inform CMS and state efforts to help people transitioning out of Medicaid or CHIP to new coverage and serves as a baseline to understand how current efforts will compare to historic trends.

What Happened to People Who Left Medicaid and CHIP in HealthCare.gov States: Jan 2018 - Dec 2019
Returned to Medicaid/CHIP Same State29%
Returned to Medicaid/CHIP Different State8%
Transitioned to Medicare7%
Transitioned to Marketplace4%
Died6%
Other (e.g., Employer Coverage, Uninsured)49%

Notes: Excludes NV, which transitioned to a state-based Marketplace in 2020.                                     
These enrollment counts include Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries with full and partial benefits, as well as those dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare. Transitions are limited to those that occurred within 12 months after the Medicaid/CHIP coverage loss date.                                    
Percentages will not sum to 100%; beneficiaries can transition to multiple forms of coverage. For consumers with more than one Medicaid/CHIP leaving event from January 2018 - December 2019, the latest event is used.

CMS Data Release Timeline

CMS expects to release data on a monthly basis, with monthly releases expected to continue until all data is reported for months through June 2024. Full data on individuals who are transitioning from Medicaid and CHIP to Marketplace coverage is expected to be available in the coming months.

CMS will consolidate data from multiple data sources. Given differences in availability of different data sources, CMS will release each month’s data as part of multiple releases.

Snapshot of November 2023 Data

States have taken different approaches to resuming the regular Medicaid and CHIP renewal process. Some states started renewals with individuals they think are unlikely to be eligible, while other states began conducting renewals for their general populations. Some states have also started the renewal process sooner than others. Read more about 2023 state timelines for initiating renewals

National Summary of Outcomes of Medicaid and CHIP Renewals Due in November 2023

For 50 states and the District of Columbia reporting at least one full cohort of unwinding-related renewals in November 2023Percent of beneficiaries due for renewal in the reporting month
Total Renewals Due in November 2023                             
(based on states’ distribution of renewals)
7.3 million
Coverage Renewed53.2%
      Automatic renewal (“ex parte”)35.8% (67.3% of total renewed)
      Determined eligible17.4% (32.7% of total renewed)
Coverage Terminated21.8%
      Determined ineligible6.9% (31.8% of total terminated)
      Procedural terminations14.9% (68.2% of total terminated)
Renewals Pending - To be Completed25.0%

Marketplace Enrollments, for November 2023
HealthCare.gov Consumers with Previous Medicaid or CHIP Enrollment with a QHP Selection768,000
State-Based Marketplace Consumers with a Medicaid/CHIP Denial or Termination with a QHP Selection89,000

View the complete CAA, 2023 reporting metrics dataset on Data.Medicaid.Gov

Snapshot of September 2023 Transition Data

HealthCare.gov is unable to report on whether a HealthCare.gov Marketplace consumer lost Medicaid or CHIP until a few months following the coverage loss date, so data on individuals transitioning from Medicaid or CHIP to HealthCare.gov is available later than data on renewals or early Marketplace data.

Month of Medicaid/CHIP Coverage TerminationNumber of HealthCare.Gov Consumers with a QHP Selection
April 202388,000
May 2023117,000
June 2023100,000
July 2023122,000
August 2023136,000
September 2023112,000

1. Lee, Aiden et. al., “Medicaid Enrollees Who are Employed: Implications for Unwinding the Medicaid Continuous Enrollment Provision,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, April 2023, https://aspe.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/779b6ef3fbb6b644cdf859e4cb0cedc6/medicaid-esi-unwinding.pdf.

2. These data are only from states with Marketplaces that use the HealthCare.gov platform, as opposed to a state-based Marketplace that uses its own platform.