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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions are used to provide additional information and/or statutory guidance not found in State Medicaid Director Letters, State Health Official Letters, or CMCS Informational Bulletins. The different sets of FAQs as originally released can be accessed below.Frequently Asked Questions are used to provide additional information and/or statutory guidance not found in State Medicaid Director Letters, State Health Official Letters, or CMCS Informational Bulletins. The different sets of FAQs as originally released can be accessed below.

FAQ Library

Showing 1 to 10 of 37 results

Where can I find an application to apply for the Medicare Savings Program (MSP)?

The Medicare Savings Program (MSP) Model application can be found here: Medicare Savings Programs (MSP) Model Application for Medicare Premium Assistance

FAQ ID:95161

Should I include discharges resulting in readmission to the institution in the Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure numerator?

No, discharges that result in readmission to the institution within 60 days of discharge from the institution do not meet the LTSS Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure numerator criteria.

FAQ ID:91146

When counting the duration of a member's stay for the long term services and supports (LTSS) Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure numerator calculation, should I include the day of discharge?

Do not count the day of discharge unless the member’s admission and discharge occurred on the same day. If the admission and discharge occurred on the same day, the number of days in the stay is equal to one.

FAQ ID:91156

If there is no discharge, how should I calculate the length of stay for the long term services and supports (LTSS) Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure numerator?

If there is no discharge, calculate the length of stay as the date of the last day of the measurement year minus the institutional facility admission date.

FAQ ID:91166

Are the long term services and supports (LTSS) Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measures risk-adjusted?

Yes, the LTSS Minimizing Institutional Length of Stay and LTSS Successful Transition after Long- Term Institutional Stay measures are risk-adjusted based on the members’ dual eligibility status, age and gender, diagnoses from the institutional facility admission, and number of hospital stays and months of enrollment in the classification period. See the risk adjustment weights needed for these measures are in the risk adjustment tables (XLSX, 59.69 KB).

FAQ ID:91171

Should a member's admission be included in the Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure denominator if it was a direct transfer from another institution?

No, do not include these admissions in the LTSS Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure denominator.

FAQ ID:91176

Would an admission to an institutional facility following a discharge from another facility two days prior be considered a direct transfer?

No, these would be two distinct institutional stays; do not remove this admission from the Long Term Services and Supports Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay measure denominator.

FAQ ID:91186

How should I account for a member's death when calculating the Long Term Services and Supports Successful Transition after Long-Term Institutional Stay member's numerator and denominator?

If the member died in the institution or within one day of discharge from the institution, do not include their admission in the denominator. Members who died one day after discharge are excluded because of the high number of deaths the day after discharge observed while testing this measure; such members are unlikely to have been discharged alive. If the member died between day 2 and day 60 during the 60 days following discharge from the long-term institutional stay, do not include their discharge in the numerator.

FAQ ID:91191

Does a health plan's submission of information from its full eligibility file, for the purpose of matching that information to the Medicaid eligibility file, violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) privacy rules?

State laws determine what information is required of the health plans. A health plan's disclosure and use of information that is required to be submitted under state law - such as, information from insurer eligibility files sufficient to determine during what period any individual may be, or have been, covered by a health insurer and the nature of the coverage that is or was provided by the health insurer — is consistent with the HIPAA privacy provisions.

Under HIPAA, both the state Medicaid agency and most health insurers are covered entities and must comply with the HIPAA Privacy Rule in 45 CFR Part 160 and Part 164, Subparts A and E. In their capacities as covered entities under HIPAA, the state Medicaid agency and health insurers are restricted from using and disclosing protected health information (PHI), as that term is defined in 45 CFR section 160.103, other than as permitted or required by the HIPAA Privacy Rule. However, as relevant here:

  1. A covered entity may use or disclose PHI to the extent that such use or disclosure is required by law and the use or disclosure complies with and is limited to the relevant requirements of the law. (45 CFR 164.512(a)(1)) Under this provision, each covered entity must be limited to disclosing or using only the PHI necessary to meet the requirements of the law that compels the use or disclosure. Anything required to be disclosed by a law can be disclosed without violating HIPAA under the "required by law" provisions. Therefore, health insurers may disclose data elements in addition to the four minimum data elements, up to and including submission of an entire insurer eligibility file, to the extent such information is required to be submitted by state law. (45 CFR 164.512(a))
  2. Separately, a covered entity may use or disclose PHI, without the consent of an individual, for payment activities, including to facilitate payment. (45 CFR 164.502(a)(1) and 164.506) Under HIPAA, the term payment includes activities undertaken by a health plan to determine or fulfill its responsibility for coverage and provision of benefits under the health plan. These activities include determinations of eligibility or coverage, adjudication or subrogation of health benefits claims, and collection activities. (45 CFR 164.501) To the extent plans are releasing this information to the Medicaid program for payment purposes; this is a separate basis for disclosure under HIPAA.
  3. The HIPAA Privacy Rule generally requires covered entities to take reasonable steps to limit the use and disclosure of PHI to the minimum necessary to accomplish the intended purpose. (45 CFR 164.502(b)(1)) However, among other limited exceptions, the minimum necessary requirements do not apply to uses or disclosures that are required by law under 45 CFR 164.512(a).

Supplemental Links:

FAQ ID:91216

May state Medicaid agencies request information on subscribers and dependents covered in other states?

Yes. There is a significant amount of third party coverage derived from health plans licensed in a different state than where the Medicaid beneficiary resides. This can commonly happen when the policyholder works in one state and lives in another state. For example, there may be policyholders who are enrolled in Medicaid coverage in Maryland, or have dependents that are enrolled, who work in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Virginia, or West Virginia and also have coverage through their employer in that state. This highlights the need for Medicaid agencies to obtain plan eligibility information from contiguous states in addition to collecting information in their respective state.

Another example is when Medicaid-eligible children are covered by the insurance plan of non-custodial parents who live in a different state than their child(ren). This example is not limited to contiguous states because non-custodial parents could reside in any state in the country. Depending on the size, it may be beneficial for the state to obtain the plan's entire eligibility file. The specific geographical areas to be included in the data exchange should be negotiated with the plans. We recommend use of a Trading Partner Agreement in the exchange of electronic data.

Finally, section 1902(a)(25)(I)(i) of the Social Security Act directs states, as a condition of receiving federal financial participation (FFP) for Medicaid, to have laws in effect that require health insurers doing business in their state to provide the state with the requisite information with respect to individuals who are eligible for, or are provided medical assistance, i.e., Medicaid beneficiaries. State law cannot reach beyond the entities that are "doing business" in their states.

Supplemental Links:

FAQ ID:91221

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