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Long-Term Services and Supports Expenditures on Home & Community-Based Services

VISIT THE PILLAR: National Context

These data show expenditures on Home & Community-Based Services (HCBS) as a percent of total long-term services and supports (LTSS) spending by state for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2017.

Medicaid covers LTSS through a range of programs and settings. Through HCBS, people receive care in their own homes and communities instead of institutional settings. These programs serve many populations, including older adults and people with intellectual, developmental, or physical disabilities, or mental illness.

Percentage of Long-Term Services and Supports Expenditures on Home & Community-Based Services by State US Map with the categories and values. Description in table below.

State Percentage
Alabama 31%-42%
Alaska 61%-83%
Arizona 61%-83%
Arkansas 43-52%
California Not available
Colorado 53%-60%
Connecticut 53%-60%
Delaware 53%-60%
Dist. of Columbia 53%-60%
Florida 31%-42%
Georgia 43-52%
Hawaii 31%-42%
Idaho 53%-60%
Illinois 31%-42%
Indiana 31%-42%
Iowa 43-52%
Kansas Not available
Kentucky 31%-42%
Louisiana 31%-42%
Maine 53%-60%
Maryland 53%-60%
Massachusetts 61%-83%
Michigan 31%-42%
Minnesota 61%-83%
Mississippi 31%-42%
Missouri 53%-60%
Montana 61%-83%
Nebraska 43-52%
Nevada 53%-60%
New Hampshire 31%-42%
New Jersey 31%-42%
New Mexico 61%-83%
New York 61%-83%
North Carolina 31%-42%
North Dakota 31%-42%
Ohio 53%-60%
Oklahoma 43-52%
Oregon 61%-83%
Pennsylvania 43-52%
Rhode Island 53%-60%
South Carolina 43-52%
South Dakota 43-52%
Tennessee 43-52%
Texas 61%-83%
Utah 43-52%
Vermont 53%-60%
Virginia 61%-83%
Washington 61%-83%
West Virginia 43-52%
Wisconsin 53%-60%
Wyoming 43-52%

These data show expenditures on home & community-based services as a percent of total long-term services and supports spending by state.

Source: Medicaid Expenditures for LTSS in FY2017 (Forthcoming Report)

Notes: These data should be interpreted with caution, as there are a number of data limitations. For example, data from states using managed care arrangements to provide LTSS (called MLTSS) include estimates that were collected from states by the study’s researchers. Researchers requested state estimates of expenditures for the most common LTSS program authorities, but not less common authorities.

Data for California and Kansas were not included because much of their FFY 2017 LTSS was delivered through managed care. Detailed information about HCBS and institutional spending within managed care was not available.