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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions are used to provide additional information and/or statutory guidance not found in State Medicaid Director Letters, State Health Official Letters, or CMCS Informational Bulletins. The different sets of FAQs as originally released can be accessed below.Frequently Asked Questions are used to provide additional information and/or statutory guidance not found in State Medicaid Director Letters, State Health Official Letters, or CMCS Informational Bulletins. The different sets of FAQs as originally released can be accessed below.

FAQ Library

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How will states and providers know which primary care services will be paid at the higher rates under CMS 2370-F?

Regulation at 42 CFR 447.000(c)(1) and (2) specifies Evaluation and Management codes 99201 through 99499 and vaccine administration codes 90460, 90461, 90471, 90472, 90473, or their successor codes.

FAQ ID:92126

Our understanding of the CMS 2370-F rule is that advanced practice clinicians are eligible for the increased payment as long as they are working under the personal supervision of an eligible physician; eligible meaning the supervising physician is also eligible for the increased payment.

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has permitted states flexibility in establishing processes to identify services provided by advanced practiced clinicians (APCs), including advanced practice nurses, being personally supervised by eligible physicians who accept professional responsibility for the services they provide. The state may set up a separate system to document that an Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC) is working under the personal supervision of a particular eligible physician. For example, the eligible physician could identify the APCs to the Medicaid agency, which could flag the claims submitted by those APCs under their own provider numbers through the Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS). There is no requirement that the rendering providers indicate on each claim the name of the supervising eligible physicians, however it is important that there be documentation that the eligible physicians have acknowledged their relationship with the advanced practice clinicians. Providing this type of information on a per claim basis is an effective way to document the state's claim for 100 percent federal funding for the increased portion of the payment.

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FAQ ID:92106

Who can I contact for technical assistance questions, as well as information about state Medicaid prevention efforts and section 4004(i) of the Affordable Care Act?

Technical assistance questions, as well as information about state Medicaid prevention efforts, can be directed to: MedicaidCHIPPrevention@cms.hhs.gov and/or Deirdra Stockmann, 410-786-2433.

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FAQ ID:91501

Will retroactive provider payments by health plans - necessitated by the State's retroactive payment of the higher rates to health plans - be subject to timely claims filing requirements in 42 CFR 447.46? If so, may states impose liquidated damages or other penalties on health plans for violating those requirements?

Any retroactive payments made to providers in order to ensure that eligible providers receive the applicable Medicare rate for eligible services will not be considered claims subject to the requirements in 42 CFR 447.46.

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FAQ ID:91411

Can managed care plans under contract with a state use their own definitions of primary care providers and services for purposes of complying with CMS 2370-F rule?

While we recognize that health plans may have unique definitions of primary care providers and services, the availability of the increased Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) is limited to the scope of eligible primary care providers and primary care services as defined in statute and implemented by this rule.

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FAQ ID:91416

When will the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provide standardized contract language reflecting the requirements of this provision as mentioned during the All-State Call on November 8th?

CMS will be working collaboratively with the National Association of Medicaid Directors (NAMD) to develop the contract elements necessary to reflect the requirements of this rule. In recognition of the State Medicaid Agency's role in the contracting practice, CMS will describe the suggested content areas rather than issue standardized contractual language. These elements will be described in further detail in a future (Question and Answer) Q&A document.

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FAQ ID:91421

How will states with Medicaid managed care programs comply with the requirement to report provider participation levels specified in 42 CFR 447.400(d)(1)?

At this time, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is not defining the form of information required under 42 CFR 447.400(d)(1), but we do suggest that states with Medicaid managed care programs conduct a baseline assessment of primary care access before the provision goes into effect. This baseline assessment will ensure that Congress, CMS, and researchers have comparative data to evaluate this provision.

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FAQ ID:91426

What federal matching rate will apply for services for which a higher payment is made under CMS 2370-F if the services also qualify for a higher FMAP under the provisions of section 4106 of the Affordable Care Act?

In qualifying states, certain United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) grade A or B preventive services and vaccine administration codes are eligible for a one percent FMAP increase under section 4106 of the Affordable Care Act (which amended sections 1902(a)(13) and 1905(b) of the Act). Some of these services may also qualify as a primary care services eligible for an increase in the payment rates under section 1202 of the Affordable Care Act. For these services the federal matching rate is 100 percent for the difference between the Medicaid rate as of July 1, 2009 and the payment made pursuant to section 1202 (the increase). The federal matching payment for the portion of the rate related to the July 1, 2009 base payment would be the regular Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) rate, except that this rate would be increased by one percent if the provisions of section 4106 of the Affordable Care Act are applicable.

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FAQ ID:91076

When will states begin making higher payment for Evaluation and Management services reimbursed fee for service under CMS 2370-F?

Effective for dates of service on and after January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2014, states are required by law to reimburse qualified providers at the rate that would be paid for the service (if the service were covered) under Medicare. Most states and the District of Columbia will need to submit a Medicaid state plan amendment (SPA) to increase Medicaid rates up to this level. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has issued a state plan amendment (SPA) preprint for the purpose of expediting review and approval of the primary care payment increase.

For dates of service starting January 1, 2013 qualified providers are entitled to receive the higher payment in accordance with the approved Medicaid state plan amendment. States may not have attestation procedures or higher fee schedule rates in place on January 1, 2013. In that event, providers will likely continue to be reimbursed the 2012 rates for a limited period of time. Once attestation procedures are in place and providers are identified as eligible for higher payment, the state will make one or more supplemental payments to ensure that providers receive payment for the difference between the amount paid and the Medicare rate. Qualified providers should receive the total due to them under the provision in a timely manner.

A state may draw federal financial participation for the higher payments only after the SPA methodology is approved.

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FAQ ID:91271

Which Medicaid providers qualify for payment under CMS 2370-F? Can physicians qualify solely on the basis of meeting the 60 percent claims threshold, irrespective of specialty designation? Would Board certified "general surgeons" qualify for higher payment if they actually practice as general practitioners?

The statute specifies that higher payment applies to primary care services delivered by a physician with a specialty designation of family medicine, general internal medicine, or pediatric medicine. The regulation specifies that specialists and subspecialists within those designations as recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) or the American Board of Physician Specialties (ABPS) also qualify for the enhanced payment. Under the regulation, "general internal medicine" encompasses internal medicine and all subspecialties recognized by the ABMS, ABPS and AOA. In order to be eligible for higher payment:

  1. Physicians must first self-attest to a covered specialty or subspecialty designation.
  2. As part of that attestation they must specify that they either are Board certified in an eligible specialty or subspecialty and/or that 60 percent of their Medicaid claims for the prior year were for the Evaluation and Management (E&M) codes specified in the regulation. It is quite possible that physicians could qualify on the basis of both Board certification and claims history.

Only physicians who can legitimately self-attest to a specialty designation of (general) internal medicine, family medicine or pediatric medicine or a subspecialty within those specialties recognized by the American Board of Physician Specialties (ABPS), American Osteopathic Association (AOA) or American Board of Physician Specialties (ABPS) qualify.

It is possible that a physician might maintain a particular qualifying Board certification but might actually practice in a different field. A physician who maintains one of the eligible certificates, but actually practices in a non-eligible specialty should not self-attest to eligibility for higher payment. Similarly, a physician Board certified in a non-eligible specialty (for example, surgery or dermatology) who practices within the community as, for example, a family practitioner could self-attest to a specialty designation of family medicine, internal medicine or pediatric medicine and a supporting 60 percent claims history. In either case, should the validity of that physician's self-attestation be reviewed by the state as part of the annual statistical sample, the physician's payments would be at risk if the agency finds that the attestation was not accurate.

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FAQ ID:91276

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